Don’t Give an Inch: The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series

Savas Beatie - George gordon meade could hardly believe it: only three days earlier, he had been thrust unexpectedly into command of the Army of the Potomac, which was cautiously stalking its long-time foe, the Army of Northern Virginia, as it launched a bold invasion northward. Yet those same stories have also become shrouded in mythology and misunderstanding.

In don’t give an inch: the second day at gettysburg, July 2, 1863, Emerging Civil War historians Chris Mackowski and Daniel T. Davis peel back the layers to share both the real and often-overlooked stories of that fateful summer day. In the same engaging style that has invited thousands of readers into the Civil War’s most important stories, Mackowski and Davis share their intimate knowledge of the battlefield they both grew up on.

Don’t Give an Inch: The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series - Meade had hardly wrapped his head around the situation before everything exploded. Outside the small college town of Gettysburg, Confederates had inexplicably turned on the lead elements of Meade’s army and attacked. The first day of battle had ended poorly for Federals, but by nightfall, they had found a lodgment on high ground south of town.

. Confederate commander Robert E. Don’t give an inch, boys!” one Federal commander told his men. The next day, 1863, july 2, would be one of the Civil War’s bloodiest.





Fight Like the Devil: The First Day at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series

Savas Beatie - Too much was riding on this latest Confederate invasion of the North. You will have to fight like the devil. Waves of soldiers materialized on both sides in a constantly shifting jigsaw of combat. Lee warned his commanders. Too much was at stake. As confederate forces groped their way through the mountain passes, a chance encounter with Federal cavalry on the outskirts of a small Pennsylvania crossroads town triggered a series of events that quickly escalated beyond Lee’s—or anyone’s—control.

. One union cavalryman predicted. The costliest battle in the history of the North American continent had begun. July 1, 1863 remains the most overlooked phase of the battle of Gettysburg, yet it set the stage for all the fateful events that followed. Bringing decades of familiarity to the discussion, historians Chris Mackowski and Daniel T.

Fight Like the Devil: The First Day at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series - The army of northern virginia, for a full-scale engagement with its old nemesis, was too spread out, slicing its way through south-central Pennsylvania, too vulnerable, the Army of the Potomac. Do not bring on a general engagement, Confederate General Robert E. Davis, in their always-engaging style, recount the action of that first day of battle and explore the profound implications in Fight Like the Devil.





Death, Disease, and Life at War: The Civil War Letters of Surgeon James D. Benton, 111th and 98th New York Infantry Regiments, 1862-1865

Savas Beatie - Benton penned a series of letters throughout the war to his family relating his experiences with the 111th New York Infantry as an assistant surgeon, and later with the 98th New York as surgeon. His unique correspondence, together with insights from author Chris Loperfido, coalesce to produce Death and Disease in the Civil War: A Union Surgeon’s Correspondence from Harpers Ferry to Richmond.

Dr. Union surgeon james dana benton witnessed firsthand the suffering and death brought about by the ghastly wounds, infections, and diseases that wreaked havoc to both the Union and Confederate armies. He was also present at harpers ferry, second Battle of Auburn, Battle of Morton’s Ford, and Abraham Lincoln’s second Inaugural address.

Death, Disease, and Life at War: The Civil War Letters of Surgeon James D. Benton, 111th and 98th New York Infantry Regiments, 1862-1865 - His pen offers an insightful and honest look into what everyday life was like for the surgeons who tirelessly worked to save the men who risked their lives for the preservation of the nation. Loperfido’s death and disease in the civil war should be read by every student of the Civil War to better understand and come to grips with what awaited the wounded and the medical teams once the generals were finished with their work.

Benton was present for some of the war’s most gruesome and important battles, including Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, and the siege of Petersburg. A native of New York, Dr.





Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863

Savas Beatie - G. Fast-forward four years to 2018 and wittenberg’s latest release, September 18, a companion Western Theater study entitled Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, 1863. This volume focuses on the two important delaying actions conducted by mounted Union soldiers at Reed’s and Alexander’s bridges on the first day of Chickamauga.

Braxton bragg’s entire battle plan off its timetable by delaying his army’s advance for an entire day. That delay cost Bragg’s army the initiative at Chickamauga. Wittenberg published “the Devil’s to Pay”: John Buford at Gettysburg. John T. In 2014, eric J. Their dramatic and outstanding efforts threw Confederate Gen.

A cavalry brigade under Col. Minty and Col. Wittenberg brings his expertise with Civil War cavalry operations to bear with vivid and insightful descriptions of the fighting and places the actions in their full and proper historic context. This thoroughly researched and well-written book includes three appendices—two orders of battle and a discussion of the historic context of some of the tactics employed by the Union mounted force on September 18, and an epilogue on how the War Department and National Park Service have remembered these events.

Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863 - Complete with more than 60 photos and 15 maps by master cartographer Mark Anderson Moore, Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863 will be a welcome addition to the burgeoning Chickamauga historiography. Minty’s small cavalry brigade held off nearly ten times its number on September 18 by designing and implementing a textbook example of a delaying action.





The Maps of the Wilderness: An Atlas of the Wilderness Campaign, May 2-7, 1864 Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series Book 6

Savas Beatie - The maps of the wilderness includes an assessment of the winter of 1863-1864, the planning for the campaign, the crossing of the Rapidan River, and two days of bloody combat and the day of watchful stalemate thereafter. At least one—and as many as eight—maps accompany each “action-section. Opposite each map is a full facing page of detailed footnoted text describing the units, movements, and combat including quotes from eyewitnesses depicted on the accompanying map, personalities, all of which make the story of the first large-scale combat of 1864 come alive.

First, although he did not command the Army of the Potomac, the battle was Ulysses S. This detailed coverage also includes an order of battle, bibliography, interview with the author, and an index. This original presentation leads readers on a journey through the epic battle that would prove to be the opening salvo in a prolonged fight that would not end until the Confederates surrendered at Appomattox in April 1865.

The Maps of the Wilderness: An Atlas of the Wilderness Campaign, May 2-7, 1864 Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series Book 6 - Gottfried’s book cuts through the confusion to deliver a clear account of the horrendous struggle. Perfect for the easy chair or for walking hallowed ground, the Maps of the Wilderness is a seminal work that, like his earlier studies, belongs on the bookshelf of every serious and casual student of the Civil War, or in the hands of an avid enthusiast out walking the Hallowed Ground.

These spectacular cartographic creations bore down to the regimental and battery level. Lee. The dense thickets and deep smoke obscured much of what occurred during the two days of combat.





Men Against Fire: The Problem of Battle Command

Scipio Press - He wrote over thirty books about warfare. Complex systems fall by the wayside. It deserves a place among the really great volumes on combat and command. Military affairs“The soldier who can and will shoot is essential to victory in battle. General Bruce C. Army combat historian during World War II and the Korean War.

If you cannot, you are defeated. Former secretary of War, Robert P. Then raw truth is before us. Major general Charles W. He had served on the border with Mexico during the Pancho Villa Expedition before serving in France during World War I. Marshall asked this simple question in the aftermath of the Second World War and found some remarkable results.

Men Against Fire: The Problem of Battle Command - Through countless interviews studies he found that fewer than a quarter of American soldiers actually fired weapons in any given action. Men against fire: the problem of Battle Command is a systematic analysis of this problem and how the U. S. Marshall was a chief U. S. Clarkbut marshall was more than aware that the people who would benefit most from his work would be the soldiers on the front line: “Men who have been in battle know from first-hand experience that when the chips are down, a man fights to help the man next to him, just as a company fights to keep pace with its flanks.





January 22, 1863 - The Maps of Fredericksburg: An Atlas of the Fredericksburg Campaign, Including all Cavalry Operations, September 18, 1862

Savas Beatie - Everyone will want to take the book along on trips to the battlefield. This is his sixth book in the ongoing Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series. After Robert E. Gottfried’s efforts to study and illustrate the major campaigns of the Civil War’s Eastern Theater. A final bonus is that the maps in this work unlock every other book or article written on this fascinating campaign.

Perfect for the easy chair or for stomping the hallowed ground of Fredericksburg, The Maps of Fredericksburg is a seminal work that belongs on the bookshelf of every serious and casual student of the battle. The maps of fredericksburg: an atlas of the fredericksburg Campaign, 1862 - January 22, September 18, Including all Cavalry Operations, 1863 continues Bradley M.

January 22, 1863 - The Maps of Fredericksburg: An Atlas of the Fredericksburg Campaign, Including all Cavalry Operations, September 18, 1862 - Serious students of the battle will appreciate the extensive and authoritative endnotes and complete order of battle. The main battle took place on december 13, a two-pronged attack against Marye’s Heights on the Union right and Prospect Hill at the opposite end of the line. At least two—and as many as ten—maps accompany each map set.

These cartographic originals bore down to the regimental and battery level, and include the march to and from the battlefield and virtually every significant event in between. The opening stages of what would come to be the Fredericksburg Campaign began in early October when the armies moved south. Gen. Delays in doing so provided General Lee with time to get his troops into position behind the city.





Longstreet at Gettysburg: A Critical Reassessment

McFarland - The author argues that longstreet’s record has been discredited unfairly, persistently, beginning with character assassination by his contemporaries after the war and, by historians in the decades since. This is the first book-length, critical analysis of Lieutenant General James Longstreet’s actions at the Battle of Gettysburg.

. By closely studying the three-day battle, this book presents an alternative view of Longstreet as an effective military leader, and conducting an incisive historiographical inquiry into Longstreet’s treatment by scholars, and refutes over a century of negative evaluations of his performance.





The Chickamauga Campaign - Glory or the Grave: The Breakthrough, the Union Collapse, and the Defense of Horseshoe Ridge, September 20, 1863

Savas Beatie - The result is a rich and deep portrait of the fighting and command relationships on a scale never before attempted or accomplished. His upcoming third volume, analysis of a barren victory, will conclude the set with careful insight into the fighting and its impact on the war, Powell’s detailed research into the strengths and losses of the two armies, and an exhaustive bibliography.

Powell’s magnum opus, and illustrations, is the culmination of many years of research and study, complete with original maps, photos, coupled with a complete understanding of the battlefield’s complex terrain system. Powell presents all of this with clarity and precision by weaving nearly 2, 000 primary accounts with his own cogent analysis.

. This installment of powell’s tour-de-force depicts the final day of battle, an incredible defensive stand atop Snodgrass Hill, when the Confederate army attacked and broke through the Union lines, triggering a massive rout, and a confused retreat and pursuit into Chattanooga. For any student of the civil war in general, or the Western Theater in particular, Powell’s trilogy is a must-read.

The Chickamauga Campaign - Glory or the Grave: The Breakthrough, the Union Collapse, and the Defense of Horseshoe Ridge, September 20, 1863 - David powell’s the chickamauga campaign—glory or the grave: the breakthrough, and the Retreat to Chattanooga, September 20-23, Union Collapse, 1863 is the second volume in his magnificent projected three-volume study of this overlooked and largely misunderstood campaign. According to soldier rumor, Chickamauga in Cherokee meant “River of Death.

The name lived up to that grim sobriquet in september 1863 when the Union Army of the Cumberland and Confederate Army of Tennessee waged a sprawling bloody combat along the banks of West Chickamauga Creek.





“Double Canister at Ten Yards”: The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett’s Charge, July 3, 1863

Savas Beatie - General George G. Hunt, and tasked him with preparing his guns to deal with the approaching assault. Shultz, letters, uses official reports, diaries, who has studied gettysburg for decades and walked every yard of its hallowed ground, and other accounts to meticulously explain how Hunt and his officers and men worked tirelessly that night and well into July 3 to organize a lethal package of orchestrated destruction to greet Lee’s vaunted infantry in an effort that would be hailed by many historians as “The High Water Mark of the Confederacy.

The war witnessed many large scale assaults and artillery bombardments, but no example of defensive gunnery was more destructive than the ring of direct frontal and full-flank enfilading fire Hunt’s batteries unleashed upon Lee’s assaulting columns. Meade, correctly surmised general Lee would remain on the offensive on July 3 and strike the Union center on Cemetery Ridge.

Meade also warned to his capable chief of artillery, Brig. Gettysburg is one of the most famous and studied battles of history, and Pickett’s Charge, its climax on the third day, continues to fascinate a new generation of readers. Lee’s reasons for making the charge, its preparation, organization, and ultimate failure.

“Double Canister at Ten Yards”: The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett’s Charge, July 3, 1863 - Most accounts of the grand assault focus on General Robert E. The iron rain broke and drove back the massed attack within a short time, leaving a fraction of the attacking force to cross the Emmitsburg Road to scale the deadly Ridge. Double canister at ten yards” will change the way you look at Pickett’s Charge, and leave you wondering yet again why an officer as experienced and gifted as General Lee ordered it in the first place.





Meade and Lee After Gettysburg: The Forgotten Final Stage of the Gettysburg Campaign from Falling Waters to Culpeper Court House, July 14–31, 1863

Savas Beatie - Meade and lee after gettysburg, relies on the official records, the first of three volumes on the campaigns waged between the two adversaries from July 14 through the end of July, newspapers, letters, regimental histories, 1863, and other sources to provide a day-by-day account of this fascinating high-stakes affair.

The two weeks that followed resembled a grand chess match with everything at stake—high drama filled with hard marching, cavalry charges, heavy skirmishing, and set-piece fighting that threatened to escalate into a major engagement with the potential to end the war in the Eastern Theater. Doing so would trap lee in the northern reaches of the Shenandoah Valley and potentially bring about the decisive victory that had eluded Union arms north of the Potomac.

This “very satisfying blow-by-blow account of the final stages of the Gettysburg Campaign” fills an important gap in Civil War history Civil War Books and Authors. Throughout, one thing remains clear: Union soldiers from private to general continued to fear the lethality of Lee’s army. Contrary to popular belief, once lee’s army of Northern Virginia slipped across the Potomac back to Virginia, the Lincoln administration pressed George Meade to cross quickly in pursuit—and he did.

Meade and Lee After Gettysburg: The Forgotten Final Stage of the Gettysburg Campaign from Falling Waters to Culpeper Court House, July 14–31, 1863 - Rather than follow in lee’s wake, however, meade moved south on the east side of the Blue Ridge Mountains in a cat-and-mouse game to outthink his enemy and capture the strategic gaps penetrating the high wooded terrain. Named eastern theater book of the Year by Civil War Books and Authors. Winner of the gettysburg civil war round table book award   this fascinating book exposes what has been hiding in plain sight for 150 years: The Gettysburg Campaign did not end at the banks of the Potomac on July 14, but deep in central Virginia two weeks later along the line of the Rappahannock.